April 29, 2103

My goodness, I have so much to share with you.  This hiatus has been long, and needed, though I must admit that I have missed the catharsis of gathering and recording thoughts and memories.  I will fill in as best as I can for now, and soon will be sharing with you the daily goings-on of our life as the chorus-in-residence at the Spoleto Festival USA in Charleston, S. C. 

Way back in February, we spent three days in Troy, N.Y. recording an album of music by Daniel Elder.  Daniel wrote about our experiences from a composer’s perspective, and if you haven’t already, I highly recommend you check out his blog of these sessions.  You can find them here, and as  bonus, you can listen to a preview tract from the album! 

Image

In other news, I passed my oral exams, and can say with confidence that I actually enjoyed myself.  I was terribly nervous, but as the conversation started flowing I started to see the scope of all I had learned in my (far too short a) time at Westminster.  In the week following the exam, I was preparing for my final recital. 

Conducting graduate students (there are 6 first years, 6 second years) have an academic assistantship in the first year, and they work with one of the large ensembles on campus in the second year.  I have been with Dr. James Jordan and Westminster Schola Cantorum this school year, and it is with this spirited and skilled ensemble that I was fortunate to prepare and present my final conducted offering at Westminster.  I selected a piece that I first heard at the University of Arizona, sung dramatically and unforgettably by the Symphonic Choir conducting by Westminster alumna Dr. Elizabeth Schauer.  The work is for two percussionists and choir, written by French composer Emmanuel Sejourne.  Gary Cook, professor emeritus (percussion) and former Dean of the College of Music at Arizona, was one of the commissioning artists of the work, and to my great surprise and delight this past-president of the Percussive Arts Society International Convention (PASIC) travelled to New Jersey to perform with us.  The performance went even more beautifully than I could have hoped, and the work was received with great enthusiasm.   I also slept fitfully that night, with visions of shining chorister faces and groovy polyrhythms rocking me to sweet slumbers.

I have also accepted an offer to continue graduate study at Florida State University with none other than Dr. André Thomas.  It is rather poetic, I think, that the next chapter of my musical life began with a tumble off the podium at Westminster.   

About Westminster Choir

Westminster Choir is composed of students at Westminster Choir College of Rider University, a center for music study in Princeton, N.J.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to April 29, 2103

  1. folkharper says:

    Congrats on all of your good news and successes.

  2. Okay. I must meet you at Alumni week! I have loved your blogs.
    Louise H. Beard, ’71
    Ask Tom Faracco to connect us!

  3. Stephen says:

    I hope to thank you personally for sharing these moments with us during Alumni Week.

    • Stephen says:

      I’m an acquaintance of Drew Lusher. Hopefully we can connect. You have created a valuable document with this blog, and all the experiences you have had. memorable forever and indelibly printed in your senses, truly.

  4. Jordan says:

    Thank you for the kind post, Stephen. It has been a joy to share these experiences, and I am thrilled that people not only read but enjoy. I will ask Drew to introduce us!

    • Stephen says:

      We will be at the concerts on Thursday afternoon. Maybe then. Also friday events but I know you will be quite busy I’m sure.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s